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Posts Tagged ‘story’

The missing WBWW story

December 31, 2012 1 comment

DavidWeeks after the end of WBWW, and the winner has been announced, I found this exciting gem in my email spam folder. My heart sank as I realised what had happened, this had been submitted by email but for some unknown reason was treated like spam. Usually I trust Gmail, as it usually does a decent job of distinguishing actual spam, but for some reason it hide this away from me. The story was submitted by Wes from OtherSpace. We’ve featured several articles by Wes about his MUSH.

I can’t apologise enough to Wes, this is a great story but unfortunately it was never passed to the judges. So the best thing I can do is post it here so you can read, and wonder how well it would have done in the WBWW competition.  Read more…

1882 – WBWW runner-up

December 8, 2012 1 comment

Here’s the story that came third place in our WBWW competition. It’s the tale of a cowboy called Alex Solvay in the American old west, being told to his great grandson, also called Alex. Alex is a character in the game Blue Dwarf played on OngoingWorlds.

The story is written by Jack Tennant, who has even recorded this story to audio, which you can listen to through the YouTube video below, or read the story underneath.

Read more…

Empty Skies Over Tokyo – WBWW runner-up

December 7, 2012 1 comment

Here’s the story that came 2nd place in our WBWW competition. Empty Skies Over Tokyo written by Marissa Jeffrey from USS Victory, part of UFOP: Starbase 118.

This story got a lot of praise from one of our judges, Aimee the winner of this year’s First Person Fortnight competition.

aimee-mug-60x60The strengths of the story that spoke to me most, aside from the expected “good grammar/punctuation/understanding of storytelling”:

1) Great demonstration of “Show, don’t tell.” It’s probably the only story that didn’t do this to a fault. It was narrating but it was describing what the characters were doing and how they were interacting with their environment and thus communicating “this is good/exciting/something I’m proud of” to the reader.

2) A clear format made to show the intended style; well-chosen names of places and dates. Very striking in their military/future origin, but not over-explained.

3) It comes full circle and leaves this reader with a simple feeling of family identity and pride in one’s place in the world, but doesn’t get more complicated than that. Vocabulary is tight and story feels focused.

4) Mature and sophisticated world outlook and a writing style to match it.

I also liked the detail that the “ancestor” was from 2003. 🙂 That makes great sci-fi.

Here’s the story in full.

Read more…

Runner up – Back To the Deep End

August 5, 2012 1 comment

This story was voted 4th place in the First Person Fortnight competition. You can read the winning story here.

Back To the Deep End, written by Sue Wilson.

I am down at the Dock watching the river go by. It is running high and fast and the ripples of brown water carrying detritus from upstream; logs, bottles, plastic, bags. Occasionally they vanish, sucked under by the current, some times reappearing a few feet  away, other times being lost forever. Others spin round and round in the eddies set up by the angles around the dock gates. It is almost hypnotic – I could watch this all day.

“Cale! There you are!”

Only apparently I can’t. Read more…

Runner up – Last Rites

August 4, 2012 1 comment

This story was voted 3rd place in the First Person Fortnight competition. You can read the winning story here.

Last Rites, written by Mark Vorenkamp.

The once brilliant blonde hair was nearly all gone and what remained had turned grey-white. The fit physique of a country-boy had become the ponch of an older man in the age of easy divorce and fast food. The boyish charm and easy smile of long ago had been replaced by a pleading look and a slight quiver at the edges of his mouth.
How I hated him.
We had met a lifetime before, 1953, before civil rights, in a small town in the Deep South where even today crosses are burned in front yards and “good old boys” were the celebrated norm. I had the misfortune of having been born there. I walked an hour every morning to the small run-down school in the next town while my neighbors climbed into school busses and rode in comfort to the new brick structure standing as a monument in the center of town. That particular day I had been running late, having stayed after school to finish my work in one of the dozen communal-textbooks shared between the three classes of senior math. I had no choice but to take a short cut through a local farm to get to the elementary school before my brother and sister were released. They weren’t allowed to walk themselves back to town. Read more…

Runner up – Ethical Considerations

August 2, 2012 2 comments

This story was voted 2nd place in the First Person Fortnight competition. You can read the winning story here.

Ethical Considerations, written by Alleran Tan from Starbase 118.

I was born on Ferenginar and, much like most Ferengi, I was raised with the principles of our species: a form of hyper-capitalist profit-seeking completely out of place with nearly every other warp-capable civilization in the Alpha Quadrant. For all of my life this was all I cared about, a numbers game. How many bars, how many strips, how many slips. Credits and debits, stock options, negative gearing and dividend reinvestment.

How small and pathetic all that seems to me now. Read more…

Should story posts be private?

April 9, 2010 3 comments
Private sign

Some PBP/PBEM games can be set to private so that you can't see their messages but what have they got to hide? There are some disadvantages of a private game

Play-by-email and play-by-post games have in the past been either private or public, and in this article we’re going to look at the advantages and disadvantages of each, and see why people might want their games to be public or private.

What is public or private?

Traditional play-by-email games (PBEM) were stories told by users who sent emails to each other, always keeping every member in the group cc’d into the email, or every member was part of a “newsgroup”, where emailing one email address distributed the email to all members of the group. Doing this meant that the posts that you sent to each other were only ever seen by other members of the group.

Games played on a public forum, or Yahoo groups are often public. This means they can be seen by anyone who has navigated to the website, and doesn’t have to be a member to view all posts in the story so far. In both forums and a Yahoo group, you have the option to make all posts private if you need to. This means that only members will be able to see the posts, retaining your privacy.

Read more…